Develop Cost Effective Design and Rehabilitation Strategies for Permeable Friction Courses

Thousands of miles of permeable friction course (PFC) pavements have performed well for the last ten (10) to fifteen (15) years on Texas highways. PFC pavement reduces hydroplaning, splash and spray, pavement noise, and improves ride quality and safety in wet weather. Hundreds of miles of PFC pavements are now at the end of their service life and need rehabilitation. The most common distress observed is raveling. To date, the most widely used method of rehabilitating PFC pavement is to mill the existing layer and replace it with a new wearing layer. This is also the most conservative and most expensive rehabilitation strategy. The research team will determine if there are less expensive resurfacing options which do not include milling. The research team will review the current PFC pavement design procedures to determine if improvements can be made to achieve longer initial life. PFC pavements have many safety related advantages, but their use is on the decline because of the high cost of rehabilitation.

Language

  • English

Project

  • Status: Active
  • Funding: $399,957
  • Contract Numbers:

    0-7110

  • Sponsor Organizations:

    Texas Department of Transportation

    125 E. 11th Street
    Austin, TX  United States  78701-2483
  • Managing Organizations:

    Texas Department of Transportation

    125 E. 11th Street
    Austin, TX  United States  78701-2483
  • Project Managers:

    Pridgen, Shelley

  • Performing Organizations:

    Texas A&M Transportation Institute

    Texas A&M University System
    3135 TAMU
    College Station, TX  United States  77843-3135
  • Principal Investigators:

    Arambula, Edith

  • Start Date: 20210901
  • Expected Completion Date: 20230831
  • Actual Completion Date: 0

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01782697
  • Record Type: Research project
  • Source Agency: Texas Department of Transportation
  • Contract Numbers: 0-7110
  • Files: RIP, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Sep 23 2021 10:20AM