Spatial Implications of Telecommuting in the United States

If the 2020 surge in working from home became permanent, how would the distribution of jobs and residents within and across U.S. cities change? What would be the effect on the demand for commuting and freight transport? The research team will address these questions using a quantitative spatial equilibrium model of on-site and remote worker location choice and transport demand in the contiguous United States. In order to assess the potential medium and long-run impact of these changes on the demand for transportation, a sufficiently-detailed quantitative spatial equilibrium model is essential. Any decline in commuting resulting from increased remote work is likely to be very heterogeneous across commuting routes. Moreover, as workers reposition themselves within cities, demand for some routes could actually increase. Such a major change in the technology of work may also trigger significant reallocations of jobs and residents across cities. Because of this, some areas may see their demand for all kinds of transport increase. The research team will build a quantitative spatial model of the contiguous United States. It will be informed by data on telecommuting potential for different industries and occupations, as well as detailed geographic data on transport infrastructure, observed commuting flows, wages, real estate prices, and education levels. This will allow the model to make predictions about the reallocation of jobs and workers both within and across U.S. metro areas, and the resulting changes in transport demand, under a number of plausible long-run remote-working scenarios. In particular, we will be able to make predictions for California and its major metropolitan areas, such as Los Angeles, San Francisco-SanJose, Riverside-San Bernardino, San Diego, and Sacramento.

Language

  • English

Project

  • Status: Active
  • Funding: $100000
  • Contract Numbers:

    DOT 69A3551747114

  • Sponsor Organizations:

    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology

    University Transportation Centers Program
    Department of Transportation
    Washington, DC  United States  20590

    National Center for Sustainable Transportation

    University of California, Davis
    Davis, CA  United States 
  • Managing Organizations:

    National Center for Sustainable Transportation

    University of California, Davis
    Davis, CA  United States 

    METRANS Transportation Center

    University of Southern California
    Los Angeles, CA  United States  90089-0626
  • Project Managers:

    Iacobucci, Lauren

  • Performing Organizations:

    National Center for Sustainable Transportation

    University of California, Davis
    Davis, CA  United States 

    METRANS Transportation Center

    University of Southern California
    Los Angeles, CA  United States  90089-0626
  • Principal Investigators:

    Parkhomenko, Andrii

    Delventhal, Matthew

  • Start Date: 20210816
  • Expected Completion Date: 20220815
  • Actual Completion Date: 0
  • USDOT Program: University Transportation Centers

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01778584
  • Record Type: Research project
  • Source Agency: National Center for Sustainable Transportation
  • Contract Numbers: DOT 69A3551747114
  • Files: UTC, RIP
  • Created Date: Jul 30 2021 1:52PM