Analyzing And Defending Cyberattacks on Electric, Hybrid and Autonomous Vehicle Battery Systems

The project team envisions two key technology trends that are poised to revolutionize the automotive industry in the near future: (1) the commoditization of electric vehicles (EVs) and (2) the emergence of autonomous driving systems. These trends offer great promise to different stakeholders (consumers, car manufacturers, governments, society) in terms of costs, efficiency, and environmental impact. While the benefits are promising, they are accompanied by (valid) concerns with respect to safety and security. EVs in particular at present have an increased perceived safety and security risk due to concerns about fire hazards (e.g., large battery packs contain flammable electrolytes), ``range anxiety'' (e.g., driving range on a single charge), and battery life. These concerns with respect to car safety are very real -- recent hack with Jeep Cherokee proves this point! The goal of the team's research project is to develop a principled understanding of the challenges associated in electric vehicle safety and security specifically targeted at the battery system (e.g., safety, range, life). To this end, the team will develop (1) develop robust models for degradation and identify danger zones of operation; (2) systematic ``attack graphs'' that shed light on possible attack strategies; (3) concrete demonstrations of attacks against EV batteries; and (4) control strategies to mitigate the damage from these attacks.

    Project

    • Status: Active
    • Funding: $127500
    • Contract Numbers:

      DTRT-13G-UTC-26

    • Sponsor Organizations:

      Technologies for Safe and Efficient Transportation University Transportation Center

      Carnegie Mellon University
      Pittsburgh, PA  United States  15213

      Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology

      University Transportation Centers Program
      Department of Transportation
      Washington, DC  United States  20590
    • Managing Organizations:

      Carnegie Mellon University

      Pittsburgh, PA  United States 
    • Project Managers:

      Ehrlichman, Courtney

    • Performing Organizations:

      Carnegie Mellon University

      Pittsburgh, PA  United States 
    • Principal Investigators:

      Viswanathan, Venkat

    • Start Date: 20170101
    • Expected Completion Date: 20180730
    • Actual Completion Date: 0
    • USDOT Program: University Transportation Centers Program

    Subject/Index Terms

    Filing Info

    • Accession Number: 01645905
    • Record Type: Research project
    • Source Agency: Technologies for Safe and Efficient Transportation University Transportation Center
    • Contract Numbers: DTRT-13G-UTC-26
    • Files: UTC, RiP
    • Created Date: Sep 6 2017 7:47PM