Impacts of Connected Vehicles and Automated Vehicles on State and Local Transportation Agencies--Task-Order Support. Task 12. Business Models to Facilitate Deployment of CV Infrastructure to Support AV Operations

With development of autonomous or fully automated vehicles (AV) progressing rapidly, some observers are concerned that many of the road-safety, congestion-relief, energy-savings, pollution-reduction, and other public benefits that AV technology is predicted to deliver will depend on road infrastructure’s ability to exchange information with vehicles. Consideration of this exchange between vehicles and infrastructure (I2V or V2I) is a part of a broader interest in connected vehicle (CV) technology that often is conflated with AV technology in public policy discussions. Some observers assert that CV technology—including I2V/V2I—is an essential adjunct to successful AV development, and that possibly substantial infrastructure investments will be required for CV deployment. The state departments of transportation and other agencies at local, metropolitan, and multi-state levels of government (here referred to generally as DOTs) may be called on the make such investments. At the same time, DOTs are faced with declining revenue streams and competing demands for repair and replacement of aging facilities. While AV technology is being developed and deployed largely in the private sector, DOTs have a definite role in development and deployment of CV infrastructure; and developing this infrastructure will likely require a decade or more. How vehicle purchasers, road users, and the broader audience of taxpayers and other stakeholders perceive and respond to AV and CV technology applications will undoubtedly influence the path and speed of development and deployment. Research is needed to (1) describe scenarios characterizing how CV infrastructure technology may be developed and deployed and (2) assess the business case for DOTs to make investments in CV infrastructure—alone and in partnership with private enterprise—to realize the greatest public benefits of AV technology. The results of this research should inform DOT decisionmakers and other stakeholders regarding the magnitude and distribution of public and private interests in CV infrastructure development and deployment, viable business models for DOT participation in the CV technology marketplace, and ways to define and evaluate strategic CV infrastructure investment and management options. The research and its results must be sensitive to technical and non-technical obstacles to CV infrastructure development and deployment in rural and urban settings, how those obstacles may be avoided or overcome, and possible variation of stakeholders’ interests and priorities among states and market segments.The objectives of this NCHRP project will be to provide guidance for DOT decisionmakers on (1) the issues of public investment in CV infrastructure and the potential impact of CV infrastructure on AV deployment; (2) the business case to be made, in financial and economic terms, for DOTs to invest in CV infrastructure; and (3) how any particular DOT may develop, evaluate, and present a business case for the agency’s specific situation. The research should use and build on previous work as appropriate, and should include consideration of how data requirements and methodological limitations may influence business-case development and communication with stakeholders about the business case. The objective of this research is to provide information and guidance for decision-makers at DOTs (including for this research state transportation agencies, sub-state and multi-state entities, infrastructure owners and operators, and the like) on (1) the issues influencing investment in connected-vehicle (CV) infrastructure (including both vehicle-to-infrastructure and infrastructure-to-vehicle—V2I and I2V—communication), the potential public and private benefits and costs of CV infrastructure investment, and the potential impact of such investment on automated-vehicle (AV) deployment; (2) business cases to be made, in financial and economic terms, for investments in CV infrastructure; and (3) the methods and data any particular DOT may use to develop, evaluate, and effectively present a business case for such investment if justified by the agency’s specific situation. The research should use and build on previous work as appropriate, and should include consideration of how data requirements and methodological limitations may influence business-case risks and communication with stakeholders about a business case.

Language

  • English

Project

  • Status: Active
  • Funding: $400000
  • Contract Numbers:

    Project 20-102, Task 12

  • Sponsor Organizations:

    National Cooperative Highway Research Program

    Transportation Research Board
    500 Fifth Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20001

    American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO)

    444 North Capitol Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20001

    Federal Highway Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  United States  20590
  • Project Managers:

    Lemer, Andrew

  • Performing Organizations:

    WSP USA

    One Penn Plaza
    250 W 34th Street
    New York, New York  United States  10119
  • Principal Investigators:

    Porcari, John

  • Start Date: 20170711
  • Expected Completion Date: 20191110
  • Actual Completion Date: 0
  • Source Data: RiP Project 41006

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01607611
  • Record Type: Research project
  • Source Agency: Transportation Research Board
  • Contract Numbers: Project 20-102, Task 12
  • Files: TRB, RiP
  • Created Date: Aug 12 2016 1:00AM