Designing Bicycle and Pedestrian Traffic Count Program to Estimate Performance Measures on Streets and Sidewalks in Blacksburg, VA

This project proposes a bicycle and pedestrian count campaign that will be systematically designed to describe non-motorized traffic patterns for the entire transportation network in Blacksburg, VA. The approach involves a two stage process: 1) sitting a long-term reference network of automated counters and performing short-duration counts (~1 week) to estimate annual average daily traffic (AADT) on ~10% of the street segments in Blacksburg and 2) developing regression models based on land use and characteristics of the street network to estimate AADT at locations where counts were not collected. Previous research has found that methods developed for scaling short-duration counts of motor vehicles to long-term averages can be adjusted to provide reliable estimates of AADT for bicycles and pedestrians (Hankey et al. 2014, Nordback et al., 2013, Nosal et a. 2014); a limitation of these studies is that they focused on limited networks (i.e. off-street trails) or specific transportation corridors. The proposed work would be the first to implement this method for an entire transportation network for bicycles and pedestrians. Identifying spatial and temporal trends of bicycle and pedestrian traffic is crucial for evaluating exposure to hazard and assessing the impact of investment in future infrastructure. The project has designed the count campaign to fit seamlessly into existing best practices for motor vehicles; for example, the project will calculate analogous performance measures (i.e. AADT) and structure the counts (i.e. a combination of short-duration and references sites) in ways that could easily integrate into existing state and federal Department of Transportation (DOT) databases. The proposed study would serve as a proof-of-concept for the approach in a rural, University town. The project envisions later expanding the approach to places where land use and traffic patterns may differ; for example, locations where other members of the research team are located (Charlottesville and Alexandria, VA); communities that have demonstrated interest (e.g. Roanoke, VA; see Letters of Support) or satellite locations of the institutions (e.g. Richmond, VA). The project expects that the method could be implemented in any location throughout the country and data readily assimilated into existing databases currently maintained by state DOTs.

Language

  • English

Project

  • Status: Completed
  • Funding: $73609.00
  • Contract Numbers:

    DTRT13-G-UTC33

  • Sponsor Organizations:

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg

    Blacksburg, VA  United States  24061

    University of Virginia, Charlottesville

    P. O. Box 400195
    Charlottesville, VA  United States  22904

    Research and Innovative Technology Administration

    University Transportation Centers Program
    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  United States  20590
  • Project Managers:

    Parkany, Emily

  • Performing Organizations:

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg

    Blacksburg, VA  United States  24061

    University of Virginia, Charlottesville

    P. O. Box 400195
    Charlottesville, VA  United States  22904
  • Principal Investigators:

    Mondschein, Andrew

    Buehler, Ralph

    Hankey, Steve

  • Start Date: 20150101
  • Expected Completion Date: 0
  • Actual Completion Date: 20160531
  • Source Data: RiP Project 39386

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01557898
  • Record Type: Research project
  • Source Agency: Mid-Atlantic Transportation Sustainability Center
  • Contract Numbers: DTRT13-G-UTC33
  • Files: UTC, RiP
  • Created Date: Mar 27 2015 1:00AM