Experimental Design for Field Validation of Laboratory Tests to Assess Cracking Resistance of Asphalt Mixtures

Cracking is a primary mode of distress that creates the need for rehabilitation of asphalt pavements. Recent research studies have evaluated a variety of laboratory tests and models to assess the cracking potential of asphalt mixtures and recommended several for routine use. As asphalt mix designs become more complex with different binder modifiers, recycled materials, and warm mix asphalt technologies, pavement engineers have recognized the need to establish and implement reliable performance tests that can be used to evaluate mixes and ultimately extend the life of asphalt pavements. There are several modes of asphalt pavement cracking, such as low-temperature cracking, reflection cracking, fatigue cracking, and top-down cracking, all of which are affected by numerous factors and their interactions. One of the challenges associated with the validation of performance tests is correlating actual measured performance with the test results and associated models used to predict different modes of cracking. Full-scale field experiments, Accelerated Pavement Testing (APT) facilities, and test roads can provide well-documented loading and environmental conditions. These resources provide important links to calibrate and validate laboratory results to field performance and establish criteria for material properties and test results for use in future asphalt mixture specifications. Research is needed to select candidate laboratory cracking tests applicable for routine use and develop a plan for coordinated field experiments to establish, verify, and validate laboratory-to-field relationships for the candidate tests and criteria for assessing the cracking potential of asphalt mixtures. The objectives of this research are to (1) select candidate laboratory tests for load- and environment-associated cracking applicable for routine use through a literature review and workshop and (2) develop an experimental design for a series of coordinated field experiments to establish, verify, and validate (a) laboratory-to-field relationships for the candidate tests and (b) criteria for assessing the cracking potential of asphalt mixtures. The experiment shall provide a sound basis for recommending the tests most suitable to determine the resistance of an asphalt mixture to each type of load- and environment-associated cracking. It shall address the potential interrelationship among the various types of cracking mechanisms that contribute to load- and environment-associated cracking. The field experiments may include full-scale pavement sections as well as APT facilities.

Language

  • English

Project

  • Status: Active
  • Funding: $250000.00
  • Contract Numbers:

    Project 09-57

  • Sponsor Organizations:

    Federal Highway Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  United States  20590

    American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials (AASHTO)

    444 North Capitol Street, NW, Suite 225
    Washington, DC  United States  20001

    National Cooperative Highway Research Program

    Transportation Research Board
    500 Fifth Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20001
  • Project Managers:

    Harrigan, Edward

  • Performing Organizations:

    Texas A&M Transportation Institute, College Station

    Texas A&M University System
    3135 TAMU
    College Station, TX  United States  77843-3135
  • Principal Investigators:

    Zhou, Fujie

  • Start Date: 20140901
  • Expected Completion Date: 0
  • Actual Completion Date: 20160301
  • Source Data: RiP Project 37713

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01543616
  • Record Type: Research project
  • Source Agency: Transportation Research Board
  • Contract Numbers: Project 09-57
  • Files: TRB, RiP
  • Created Date: Nov 19 2014 1:02AM