Development of a Quantitative Model for the Mechanism of Raveling Failure in Highway Rock Slopes and Cuts

Rock falls along highways constitute a significant geological hazard, causing financial loss, damage to vehicles and infrastructure, and even injury and occasional loss of life. There is no way to model them or protect their progress or severity. Even the mechanisms are poorly understood. In Missouri rock falls or continuous issue for the Missouri Department of Transportation. A new technology called lidar [light detection and ranging] can make precise measurements of rock slopes and cuts, detecting minute differences over time and the profile of the rock face. Multiple scans over time can reveal the timing and sequence of material falling off the face and accumulating on the ground below up to and including the fall of very small individual blocks. Rock fall events can be precisely correlated with it external stimuli such as rainfall, freeze/thaw, and seismic activity. From data obtained in this manner a model of rattling will be developed particle flow code [PFC 2-D] modeling will be used to develop a predictive capability. This proposal seeks funding to do a pilot study of raveling in the field under various conditions in several different types of rock that are necessary to begin the study of the raveling process under natural conditions, and to model the rattling with PFC.


  • English


  • Status: Completed
  • Contract Numbers:



  • Sponsor Organizations:

    University of Missouri Research Board

    518 Clark Hall
    Columbia, MO  United States 
  • Principal Investigators:

    Maerz, Norbert

  • Start Date: 20110101
  • Expected Completion Date: 0
  • Actual Completion Date: 20121231
  • Source Data: RiP Project 28057

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01484901
  • Record Type: Research project
  • Source Agency: Center for Infrastructure Engineering Studies
  • Contract Numbers: DTRT06-G-0014, 00034054
  • Files: UTC, RiP
  • Created Date: Jun 26 2013 1:00AM