Noteworthy Practices in Crash Reporting and Safety Programs on Indian Tribal Reservations

Safety is a major concern for roadway practitioners across the United States. In many states, Native American population is disproportionately represented in fatalities and crash statistics. Statistics show that in South Dakota for 2005 only 52 crashes out of 737 crashes were reported to the state. The largest number of crashes reported included fatalities. Because less than 15% of identified crashes were reported to the state in 2005, the tribes in South Dakota did not receive adequate attention from state and federal programs that identify and target transportation safety issues. This lack of attention to tribal transportation safety problems will continue until tribal transportation crashes are adequately reported to the state(s). It is suspected that this issue is not confined to reservations and tribes located in South Dakota but is the norm for tribes in most states. It is therefore imperative to identify tribal crash reporting systems that do report a high percentage of the total crashes on their reservations to their respective state(s). The methods, equipment, and software used and the training provided to those responsible for writing, filing, and reporting the tribal crash reports to the state(s) need to be identified. There exist a number of noteworthy tribal crash reporting programs being used by various tribal governments across the nation. These programs need to be identified to be used as model programs for the rest of the tribes in the nation. None of these programs have been showcased at tribal meetings or through the media. A documentation compiling these programs as case studies with facts, stories, and lessons learned would serve as a valuable tool to assist tribal entities in addressing the tribal crash reporting issues on tribal lands. Native Americans particularly have the highest risk of motor-vehicle related death of all ethnic groups; for this group with ages between 4 and 44, motor-vehicle related injuries are the leading cause of death. During the time period between 1982 and 2002, according to a study conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 65 percent of Native American fatal crashes involved alcohol, as opposed to 47 percent nationwide during this same time period. In addition, it was found that from 1999 to 2004, 50 percent of Native American drivers in fatal crashes were over the legal blood alcohol content (BAC) limit. There exist a number of noteworthy DUI prevention programs being implemented by various tribal governments across the nation. These programs have targeted different tribal age groups, presented under a variety of formats, and implemented in conjunction with different events or independently. Many of these programs have been showcased at tribal meetings, through the media, and casual conversations. A documentation compiling these programs as case studies with facts, stories, and lessons learned would serve as a valuable tool to assist tribal entities in addressing the DUI issues, a major cause of fatalities on tribal lands. This document will also be useful to non-tribal local entities, where applicable, that also have been stricken by the DUI problem. The objective of this research is to develop a document that compiles various effective tribal crash reporting programs and DUI prevention programs that have been implemented successfully on Indian reservations. These programs should be diverse in terms of what they entailed, how they were implemented, who were involved, and where they were implemented geographically and culturally. The project should include the following tasks: (1) Review implemented programs, (2) develop selection criteria, (3) compile a list of programs that meet or exceed the criteria, and (4) coordinate with the programs' authors/champions to obtain permission to use programs as case studies and to obtain further information for report.

Language

  • English

Project

  • Status: Proposed
  • Funding: $200000.00
  • Contract Numbers:

    Project 17-49

  • Sponsor Organizations:

    Federal Highway Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  United States  20590

    American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO)

    444 North Capitol Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20001

    National Cooperative Highway Research Program

    Transportation Research Board
    500 Fifth Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20001
  • Project Managers:

    Hedges, Christopher

  • Start Date: 20100615
  • Expected Completion Date: 0
  • Actual Completion Date: 0
  • Source Data: RiP Project 26499

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01463909
  • Record Type: Research project
  • Source Agency: National Cooperative Highway Research Program
  • Contract Numbers: Project 17-49
  • Files: TRB, RiP, USDOT
  • Created Date: Jan 3 2013 2:32PM