Synthesis of Information Related to Airport Problems. Topic S04-03. Identification of the Requirements and Training to Obtain Driving Privileges on Airfields

During the last fifteen years the Federal Aviation Administration in conjunction with the aviation industry has placed a major emphasis on the reduction of the risk of runway incursions.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </span>Vehicle/pedestrian deviations (VPDs) account for approximately 15 to 20 percent of the annual number of incursions.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </span>Airport operators have the overall responsibility for determining who receives driving privileges on the airport operational areas (AOA), i.e., inside the fence, and therefore are directly connected to efforts to reduce VPDs.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </span></span><span style="mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">The requirements that must be met to obtain driving privileges vary widely from one airport to the next.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </span>At some airports, it may be a simple statement from the person's employer, e.g., an airline or FBO, that the person needs driving privileges.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">   </span>At other airports, the person studies the airport's driving manual and then takes a written test (this is similar to the approach that many DMV's use.)<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </span>Other airports require the person to attend a classroom training session or take a computer tutorial followed by a test.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </span>Still others may require a hands-on driving test or probationary period with an authorized driver before the employee is authorized to operate a vehicle on the AOA.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </span>Sometimes training may be conducted using a driving simulator. Airports sometime create a tier system, i.e., drivers in the top tier are allowed to drive anywhere while drivers in lower tiers are restricted to certain areas. </span><span style="mso-bidi-font-family: Arial">There are many variations to these scenarios.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">   </span>This synthesis would identify the airfield driving privilege requirements across a broad spectrum of airports and obtain information on who administers the training, the training curriculum, length of training, and the cost associated with such training for both initial and recurrent training.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </span>Background information such as number of authorized drivers on the airfield, availability of perimeter roads etc. would also be collected. The audience for this synthesis would include airport managers and those responsible for airfield safety and preventing VPDs. <o:p></o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; mso-hyphenate: none; tab-stops: -.5in 0in .5in 1.0in 1.5in 2.0in"><span style="mso-bidi-font-family: Arial"><o:p> </o:p></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; mso-hyphenate: none; tab-stops: -.5in"><span style="mso-bidi-font-family: Arial"><o:p> </o:p></span></p></span></font>


  • English


  • Status: Completed
  • Contract Numbers:

    Project 11-03, Topic

  • Sponsor Organizations:

    Federal Aviation Administration

    800 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC  USA  20591

    Airport Cooperative Research Program

    Transportation Research Board
    500 Fifth Street, NW
    Washington, DC    20001
  • Project Managers:

    Staba, Gail

  • Performing Organizations:

    Airport Safety Consultants

    209 Heatherbloom Trail
    Grambrills, MD  USA  21054
  • Principal Investigators:

    Castellano, Ben

  • Start Date: 20080501
  • Actual Completion Date: 20090601
  • Source Data: RiP Project 15472

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01462741
  • Record Type: Research project
  • Source Agency: Transportation Research Board
  • Contract Numbers: Project 11-03, Topic
  • Files: TRB, RiP, USDOT
  • Created Date: Jan 3 2013 2:09PM