High-Performance Concrete for Bridge 8F in Fredrica

Decades of exposure to traffic and the elements have left almost one-third of the nation's 582,000 bridges structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. Although these bridges are not necessarily unsafe, they are often inadequate for carrying the high traffic volumes and and heavy traffic loads common to today's highways. Many of these bridges will soon require extensive repair or even replacement. The condition of our bridges also creates problems for shippers and motorists. As load restrictions are imposed on deficient bridges, vehicles must be diverted to other routes. This can increase trip length, exacerbate congestion, and direct traffic into residential neighborhoods. Projects to repair or replace bridges create work zones that delay traffic and can endanger workers and motorists. To prevent such problems, highway agencies need to build bridges that are better able to withstand traffic and environmental demands. These bridges must also be economical to build and maintain. High Performance Concrete (HPC), which is concrete that has been designed to be more durable, and, if necessary, stronger than conventional concrete, can help highway agencies achieve these goals. The primary objective of this project was to gain an understanding of the actual post-construction performance of HPC bridge structures from both materials and structural behavior perspectives, based on the design and construction of Bridge 8F in Fredrica, Delaware.